A Classic Car Can Be A Fun Family Project

Over the years I have written a lot of articles about classic cars and the virtues of them. Nothing has changed a restoration project can bring the family together and help them learn about and respect classic cars and the restoration of them.

I’m not going to lie and say that they are cheap to build, they are not cheap. They take a lot of time and effort to restore the right way. You need to build a game plan to restore your first classic car, and every one after, over time you’ll get better at the money and budget part of the process.

The first thing that you need to do is decide what car you want to restore. If it is to be a family project I suggest having a family meeting and get everybody’s input. After you have decided on what car you want to restore you can begin the hunt for the perfect candidate for your project.

You should plan on spending at least $10,000 if you want a good classic car to start with. You should sit down with the family again and determine what your skills are in the restoration of a classic car. Is your strong area body repair and paint, interior repair, or mechanical repair, you will need to have knowledge in all of these areas or know someone who does.

The less work that you have to farm out to a shop the less money you will spend. If you are tight with money plan to do most of the work yourself. Talk to your friends and get the low down on what they know about the restoration of classic cars.

For your first classic car, I would suggest trying for a car that the manufacturer built a lot of like a Camaro, Mustang, or Chevelle or something along those lines. If you’re a Mopar guy and you’d like to build a Mopar for your first project I would suggest that you rethink that idea.

They made fewer Mopas than any other muscle cars. This tells you that parts are harder to find, and because of that, they cost more money to build. Chances are you won’t be able to buy a good starter car for that $10,000 I suggested either.

These are that things that you should look for in a starter restoration project.

  1. A car with little or no rust, rust is the hardest thing to fix body wise.
  2. A car with the electrical system in good condition.
  3. Most of the interior plastic parts in good condition
  4. Check the door and fender gaps, they should look uniform and be 1/16″ to 1/8″ wide
  5. Non-uniform gaps always mean that the part has been removed and re-installed.
  6. Check hood to fender gaps and deck lid to quarter panel gaps.

I may have missed one or two things here, but this is a good place to start. I would also suggest that you have a professional classic car inspector look at the car just to be sure. Classic cars are a lot of fun, but they can turn in to a huge can of worms very quickly.

If you leave as little to chance as you can the project will be a lot more enjoyable. You will have a lot fewer issues with it. Remember classic cars are supposed to be fun. They are not supposed to cause problems with you or anybody involved.

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